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Humboldt and Mendocino Co. gets over $18 million for road work

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HUMBOLDT& MENDOCINO COUNTY, Calif. - Senate Bill 1 was passed earlier this year. The bill allotted $54 billion toward state and local infrastructure improvement over 10 years according to Caltrans.

Bras Mettam is the deputy director of planning and local assistance for CalTrans District 1. He knows first hand how this bill can assist Humboldt County in improving its infrastructure.

"Senate Bill 1 doesn't split the money up between districts necessarily," Mettam said. "It looks at the best projects."

Mettam said that out of 13 projects beginning this year with fund from the bill, four of them are in District 1, which includes Humboldt and Mendocino County.

"Caltrans as a whole has had a lot of projects that have been in the project development process, " Mettam said. "But weren't able to be funded so these projects were ones that we've been moving along hoping at some point to be able to fund them."

The projects all have the goal of creating smoother roads, and there are several locations in Humboldt that will be worked on.

"The three in Humbol County, one is in Myers flat, one is up at the county line at the north end, and the third one is near Fortuna," Mettam said.

The other project is to resurface state Route 126 in Mendocino.

"Resurfacing is when we deal with any types of failures in the pavement, pot holes and that type of thing," Mettam said. "And then we put a new layer on top. It's brand new pavement, it eases the ride and makes the road less bumpy."

Mattem said that because these projects have been in the works for so long, there will be little delay on beginning construction. There will be delays but he said the goal is to keep them 15 minutes or less.

"Whenever there's construction there are going to be some delays," Mettam said. "We work hard to do the minimum delay's possible."

Some of the funds will also be used for small maintenance work. Mettam added that the bill is especially beneficial to rural counties.

"We've been just keeping everything together, now we can fix some of the issues," Mettam said.

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