Concerns raised over drinking water quality in Shasta County post Carr Fire


    Minturn said because there's a lot of ash on the ground and with future rain coming, the ash and sediment will flush through which will cause a problem for the water system for engineers.

    There is some concern over drinking water quality in Shasta County after multiple fires like the Delta, Hirz and Carr Fire that burned hundreds of thousands of acres.

    Shasta County Public Works Director Pat Minturn said the burned areas from the fires that are near the watershed for the local water system takes water out of the creeks and filters it.

    Minturn said because there's a lot of ash on the ground and with future rain coming, the ash and sediment will flush through which will cause a problem for the water system for engineers.

    He said so far, the water quality possess no concern and that since the fire happened during the summer, it gave them time to prepare for any drinking water concerns.

    "It's nothing for the individual homeowner to worry about. The water will meet drinking standards one way or another we'll be able to make it through. In a worst-case scenario, it will be a boil water notice might be issued if we were unable to get the sentiment out. The water will still be chlorinated. It will still be safe to drink but we may be a little bit high on turbidity," said Minturn.

    The City of Redding has made emergency plans by with having sources of water to take from i.e. Whiskeytown, Lake Redding and Sacramento River and wells from Enterprise area, according to Minturn.

    He said the city will help other districts as well like Shasta, Centerville, clear creek and Keswick area.

    So far, the transparency of the water and quality is good with the first couple of recent rains in the Northstate.

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