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Whiskeytown Cemetery cleaned up after being damaged by the Carr Fire

A local landmark damaged by the Carr Fire was cleaned up on Sunday with the help of the community and the help of a familiar face, the Northstate's very own, Preston Sharp.

Volunteers spent hours at the Whiskeytown Cemetery in Redding, cleaning and working to help restore the cemetery and honor veterans and loved one who had passed away.

A local landmark damaged by the Carr Fire was cleaned up on Sunday with the help of the community and the help of a familiar face, the Northstate's very own Preston Sharp.

Volunteers spent hours at the Whiskeytown Cemetery in Redding, cleaning and working to help restore the cemetery and honor veterans and loved one who had passed away.

Over one hundred volunteers showed up with trash bags, shovels, rakes and gloves.

"This feels amazing and I don't think I've ever had this [many] people come out even when I was honoring veterans inside of Redding. And to be 10 minutes or 15 minutes outside of Redding, and this [many] people show up, is just insane. I'm so happy with the turnout today to come help clean up Whiskeytown Cemetery."

Preston had announced on his Facebook page about having a Whiskeytown Cemetery clean up and the community overwhelming responded with cars lined up, parked outside the cemetery.

"This is important. It's part of our community. The cemetery should be taken care of and I know it probably would be [taken care of], but the community coming together to this is...I mean it's amazing. Look at all the people," said Robert Balke, a volunteer with United Shasta.

"When you come out to the Whiskeytown Cemetery or see anything that's been affected by the Carr Fire, and you see these people here and you see all the good in the town, it's just so amazing. And makes me realize from the ash, that we're all going to rise and come together as a community and do great things. When I pulled up here today and saw all these people, I started crying before we even got out of the car. It's absolutely amazing and I want to teach this young one right here about community service and giving back," said Allison Deavers from Redding awith her daughter, Olivia Deavers.

"It feels good to come together and help everybody and these people might be in the ground, but we're still helping them even though that it all burned up over here. We're trying to do our part," said Olivia Deavers.

Others came to the cemetery after finding out that their loved one's grave site was still distinguishable.

"I'm here to clean up my husband's grave at the Whiskeytown Cemetery. He was buried here about 20 years ago almost to the day. Yesterday, I came out to check and that was our wedding anniversary," said Diedra Malain. "I've been out cleaning up the grave site. It actually did very well, it survived. A lot of it survived. Some burned marks on the wood, even all the little rocks that have been left by the children around the site, collected and things, were still in place."

The cleanup was another example of the community coming together through the toughest times, to be strong for one another.

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